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  • LIVE WEBCHAT with Georgia Simmons discussion thread

     Anonymous updated 1 year, 4 months ago 16 Members · 57 Posts
  • Bukola Adisa

    Member
    November 9, 2019 at 6:25 pm

    Join us live on this thread on Wednesday, 20th November at 8pm GMT as we talk all things year end with Georgia Simmons in an exclusive first of its kind Webchat session. Appraisal season is upon us and you want to go into the sessions prepared to talk about all the amazing things you have achieved this year. POST YOUR QUESTIONS ON THIS THREAD AND GEORGIA WILL ANSWER THEM ON WEDNESDAY IN THE LIVE CHAT SESSION! 

    Georgia is an Operational Risk Director at Barclays Bank and leads a team of risk experts who ensure that the bank operates in a sustainable manner.
    She will be answering all your burning questions on:
    How to receive feedback and criticisms
    How to articulate your achievements
    Writing effective self appraisals
    Making the ask for promotions and pay rises
    Grab your favourite hot drink (or cold) and get ready for another amazing learning experience.

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 13, 2019 at 12:48 pm

    Great.

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 11:33 am

    Hi Georgia, Thanks for taking the time to answer questions on the web chat.

    What are the three most important things you would do (or expect your direct reports to do) to prepare for a year end appraisal?

    Thanks 

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 7:59 pm

      Hello, Great question: try to remember that your manager is a very busy person with their own life and what you do throughout the year may remain front and centre of your mind, but may not be front and centre of theirs – especially if they have a large number of direct reports, so:

      1) make sure you have a list of all tangible deliverables throughout the year that you achieved over and above the specific objectives, i.e. “this year I produced 12 sets of committee packs and associated minutes, managed the RAID log all year, assissted Mr Smith deliver the XYZ project, created 5x procedure documents…”etc.
      By creating a clear list of everything you did it refreshes your managers mind.

      2) write clear answers against any objectives you had. How did you meet them / exceed them? Do you have any positive feedback from anyone else regarding your delivery? What did you learn from them?

      3) also reach out to peers and colleagues for 360 review feedback to have ready to share. Give all of this a week in advance of the appraisal to ensure your manager has time to read and digest it.

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 5:02 pm

    Hi Georgia, 

    What is the best way to respond to negative feedback? Have you ever one of your reportees change or improve your outlook on their performance following their year-end conversation? 

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:05 pm

      Firstly I always try to use all feedback whether positive or developmental as a learning experience. You should never be going into a year end conversation with anything coming as a ‘surprise’ – your manager should already have made you aware of possible ‘development’ areas and be working with you on those, however if they do use end of year to drop some unexpected bombshells it’s best to stay very neutral:

      1) ask for specific examples of when you did or displayed characteristics they are outlining

      2) ask if you can work together to form a plan to develop you so you can learn from this experience

      3) politely encourage your manager to please raise feedback with you in realtime moving forward so you can better learn from it

      If however you REALLY feel strongly that they are wrong or a situation is misrepresented ask if anyone else has seen or commented on the negative point.

      It may also be worth getting a mentor or buddy who can seperately watch you and feedback to you to help you learn and grow.

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 5:33 pm

    In terms of discussing new responsibilities you would like to take on or your desired next steps in your career, would you recommend discussing these with your manager if you don’t believe the opportunities exist or see them within the team? Or do you think this would this make your manager think you are bored in your role and not committed? 

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:08 pm

      I’m a firm believer in that opportunities always exist, you just have to find them and invest time. I did well in my early career by identifying things that weren’t being done or opportunities to improve things for my management team and wider team, whilst still delivering on my BAU objectives.

      For example: you could refresh or create team procedures if none exist, or start a team people agenda, or set up some networking events at your office for other departments. Provided you’re able to get all your required work done there should be no reason for you not to be able to create other things that will make you standout and get you noticed.

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:10 pm

      I do also recommend having open honest conversations with your manager. Something like “hi manager, I’ve been doing this role for a while now. My reviews show you think I’m doing a good job. What do you see next for me, what could we do to stretch me? (I recommend you don’t have this chat if you’ve been doing the thing less than 6 months!)

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 6:18 pm

    Hi Georgia,  How do deal with untrue and unfavourable comments/ output from your manager following your assessment ? 

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:14 pm

      Hello, I think it’s REALLY important to differentiate between UNTRUE feedback vs. feedback that is true but that you just don’t like or which you may not have been expecting or which has come as a surprise.

      With UNTRUE feedback, note that you’d like the opportunity to formally respond to it, then escalate to HR or another manager and go from there.

      UNFAVOURABLE feedback while not nice to recieve may actually be true. At this point you need to discuss with your manager why you’re only finding out about it now? Ask for examples and talk about what would be a good outcome. Agree on a plan to improve on the area and take it as a learning opportunity. Also make your manager aware that they should give development feedback in realtime or as close to it as reasonable moving forward.

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 6:20 pm

    Hi Georgia, How do you find the balance between tastefully highligting your own achievements and blowing your own trumpet? 

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:18 pm

      This question made me laugh, but honestly at an end-of-year (or any other time when it comes to Personal Development) DON’T HOLD BACK! Sound that trumpet!
      But the way to do it tastefully is to ONLY include things that are 100% true, talk about facts and outcomes that are measurable, NOT your opinion.

      ALso include points on self reflection to show you are still keen to learn and understand that people are always learning. i.e. ‘I led the development of a new software platform which took 6 months. The commercial benefit was time savings of 3 months. I was particularly proud of how I established governance from nothing and chaired all the meetings, however, I think I could have managed senior management escalation in a more timley fashion, which is something I will be applying to future projects’.

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 6:40 pm

    Hi Georgia, 

    1. What is the most effective way of asking for a pay rise? 

    2. How long should I wait in a new role before discussing pay rise.

    Thank you 

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:22 pm

      Hi,

      1) I personally don’t recommend asking for a payrise within the first year, UNLESS you get promoted within that period or take on SIGNIFICANT new responsibilites.

      2) The most effective way is at a mid-year or end-of year discussion based on evidence. Research what other people doing your role are being paid in the industry (look at job boards etc), then consider how much you’ve acheived and where you’ve added value to establish a fact pattern for why you think you deserve a payrise.

      Most people HATE talking about money or get very nervous, but personally I just find it best to come out and say it (I usually start with a joke) “ok, so I know this is everyones least favourite topic, but, can I talk to you about pay for a moment…?”

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:23 pm

      But be cogniscant that your employer may not have any budget, they may not give in role pay rises and just because you’ve asked doesn’t mean you’ll get one, so do be prepared to be potentially disappointed.

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 7:20 pm

    Hi Georgia,

    During your performance review;

    1. Is it wise to show your enthusiasm to aim higher which may include working for a bigger establishment?

    2. Can I use this avenue to ask for pay rise?

    3. Mentioning my manager’s role or equivalent as my next career move may be intimidating to some managers, how to I approach this question when asked? 

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:25 pm

      1) If you mean ‘would it be wise to show that you’re considering a bigger establishment than the one you currently work for’ – absolutely not. Show enthusiasm for the role, team and company and look for growth potential there, but don’t use it as a threat to try to get more responsibility. Equally, employers and managers won’t take you suggest a bigger organisation is showing enthusiasm, they’ll just think you want to leave.

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:27 pm

      2) similarly absolutely not. Using another company or the threat of leaving to try to get more money is very very risky – they may just wave goodbye to you. Most people get based on being valued and because their current company see development potential in them. Threatening to leave is never a good idea in the longterm.

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:29 pm

      3) when asked, or even when not asked, be honest about your career goals and aspirations. You’re never going to get your managers job while they’re still in it, so you’re not a threat, but they may find overconfidence or the belief that you deserve their job irritating and that’s likely to get their back up.
      Instead, talk honestly about your next step, enhanced progression or responsibilites – don’t forget your manager is also developing and looking to progress, so it may mean that as you become ready to move up, so do they, and you can happily fit into their successon plans.

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 7:28 pm

    Hi Georgia,

    I believe someone has already touched on this in a previous question – how do you effectively challenge your manager’s assessment if you believe it’s unfair and biased in regards to team dynamics? 

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:30 pm

      Could you ellaborate on ‘team dynamics’ for me?

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:34 pm

      You are accused of not being a team player, your team is a lot younger than you and you have nothing in common with them i.e. you and the manager are the only non-graduates in the team.

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:48 pm

      In that case I’d ask for specific examples. A ‘team player’ doesn’t mean having to be friends with or socialise with or be buddies with anyone in your team (provided you’re polite and respectful of course).

      It just means ensuring that you do your job and support the team in doing their jobs with appropriate give and take. Ask for examples of what he or she means by this statement, when did he or she specifically observe you not being a team player, and ask for examples of how he or she would expect you to role model being a ‘team player’.

  • Bukola Adisa

    Member
    November 20, 2019 at 7:34 pm

    Hi all, Georgia will be on soon and we will get started! Keep sending your questions as she will answer them on a first asked, first answered basis!

    See you soon 

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 7:43 pm

    Hi Georgia, how do you handle a situation where your direct report performs fairly well on his pre-agreed KPIs for promotion but excelled in creating value to the business in some other way that is not directly related to his current role/KPIs?
    Thank you.

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:32 pm

                                  “fairly well” I’d say if he met them and did a good job but is excelling on something new that was outside his day to day, then he’s possibly starting to feel disillusioned with his current role or KPIs and is becoming demotivated, as this new task clearly got him fired up. Perhaps give him another project to see if he delivers with the same skill and enthusiasm, and if he does he’s probably ready for promotion, just fed-up with his current role. Don’t lose good, talented people for the sake of forcing 100% all the time.

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 7:44 pm

    Hi Georgia,

    How do you remain objective in response to feedback? I.e How do you reasonably determine whether the feedback is valid (but perhaps not delivered in an objective manner) or completely unfounded and based on a personal agenda?

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:36 pm

      I’m starting to get a bit worried about all these malicious, self-serving managers you all seem to have in this feed (that’s a joke), but in all seriousness, try to take a step back and be honest and objective with yourself. Emotional intelligence and self awareness and sel criticism can be extremely difficult skills to master. Is there some truth or a lot of truth in what is being said to you?
      The best way to deal with this type of feedback is to make sure you get something positive out of it:

      1) what could you have done different at the time to have got a different outcome?

      2) what can you do now / moving forward to change on an ongoing basis?

      3) create a plan that you and your manager agree to.

    • Bukola Adisa

      Member
      November 20, 2019 at 8:53 pm

      Fantastic response thanks Georgia!

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 8:00 pm

    Hi Everyone! So pleased to be here and excited to answer all your questions so keep them coming in!

    • Bukola Adisa

      Member
      November 20, 2019 at 8:03 pm

      So lovely to have you! Looking forward to this session

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 8:03 pm

    Where is the link to the live chat?

    • Bukola Adisa

      Member
      November 20, 2019 at 8:08 pm

      Hi Nnenna- it is a Webchat meaning you post your questions and Georgia responds to them on the thread as she has been doing. 

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:10 pm

      Oh ok I see – clear now!

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 8:08 pm

    Hi Georgia, During the appraisal process, do you think its best practice to have feedback from colleagues you have worked with during the year? and if so do you consider colleagues from all levels carrying the same importance?

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:38 pm

      yes definitely! I actively seek feedback throughout the year from colleagues on how I handled a certain meeting, or how my presentation was at a certain forum. At the end of year it’s best to get a mix of peers, seniors, juniors and people you have deivered for. Also TRY to get at least a few from people who you don’t necessarily get on with so well so you can get feedback which will genuinely help you to improve. Otherwise it can be tempting to just ask everyone that likes you and it’s not really useful to your development long term.

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 8:11 pm

    Hi Georgina

    How do you handle a situation at work when you request a number of training courses linked to your role as well objectives and your manager turns round says ‘I think thats too much for one year and ‘I dont think you need the said qualifications’.  

    In this case, there are no budget restrictions and these courses are linked to some of the audacious goals I have set for myself.  I didnt bother asking why he thought because I’m not interested in his thoughts.  I just want to do my courses and move to the next level in my career.

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:41 pm

      I’d probably ask: are the courses during working hours? How many have you already taken this year? Are other team members having to cover for you while you’re away on courses? Are you delivering to / meeting or exceeding all your current objectives and KPIs?

      If they’re during work hours then if you’ve taken an excessive number without making up time that he feels that there isn’t sufficient benefit to your current role in you taking more this year. Let me know the answers to the above and I can help further.

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 8:12 pm

    Another question, sometimes you have the response that in order to get promoted you have to go above and beyond, yet you have done throughout the year what’s been required of you. How would you go about convincing your manager that you deserve to be considered for a promotion?  

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:44 pm

      Doing your current role really well and ‘doing what’s expected’ isn’t enough. You need to find other things that aren’t expected, start showing initative and leading on work that goes beyond your current role.You also need to build a network of other people who will support the idea that you are operating at the next level up and should be promoted. Have you done anything to improve your knowledge or understanding of the rest of the business? Have you taken on more, new responsibility that is greater than what you were doing before? Sre you helping to develop others or develop the team or helping to improve team or business performance? Are you reading information about your role or industry sector outside work and therefore showing enhanced subject matter knowledge which would show you take promotion seriously? Or are you just doing your job well and expecting to be promoted because you’ve been there for a while?

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 8:21 pm

    Hello Georgia, how do I write an effective year end appraisal when there are no set objectives yet for me due to the time of the year I joined.

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:50 pm

      Regardless of the time of year you should always set objectives with your manager, even if you keep them offline. In this case as there are none I would create a list of all the big ticket items you’ve delivered (I gave lots of examples in my reply to the very first post in this thread if you want to have a look), explain how you delivered them, what you did well, what you’d change or do differently and what you’ve learned, and then talk about what you’ve done to improve something (if there is something obviously!) be it the team, a process you’ve worked on or something else, and then get some written feedback from other colleagues to also include.

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 8:31 pm

    Hi Georgia,

    Following on from my earlier question – how can you effectively challenge your manager when you want to progress in your role but all the projects and meaty assignments are being awarded to graduates that have just joined the company. The upshot of this is that in your appraisal you are told that you’re not developing?

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:55 pm

      Oooo, your manager is treading on a thin line here with fairness and discrimination. If you are being repeatedly overlooked then note all the programmes and assignments that weren’t awarded to you and then present them to your manager and ask specifically why they weren’t awarded to you. It’s probably 1 of 3 reasons: either your manager genuinely doesn’t think you’re capable or have the right skillset but is not having an honest development conversation with you which is unfair in itself as he’s not allowing you to improve or progress or 2) your manager is genuinely just overlooking you, in which case this will put a rocket up his bum and probably make him give you the next one that comes along or 3) (and this is the worst outcome) it’s possibly discrimination in which case you may want to start considering your options.

      But in regards to the immediate feedback: present the manager with all the programmes they didn’t give you, explain you had asked to be given somthing like that but haven’t been and ask for a reason why? then esstablish what needs to change (you / the manager / or both).

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:59 pm

      Georgia – I ended up accepting their exit package. This is all very insightful…I should have challenged more than I did. I had escalated matters to HR and had no joy there either.

      I’m asking so that next time I can avoid the outcome of last year. 

      Different mindset now as well.

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 9:06 pm

      I’m very sorry to hear this. In future make sure you have regular personal development meetings with your manager (at least once a month) and make sure they’re focussing on YOUR development, NOT your manager using them as a lazy way to track where you’re up to with work. Make sure you recieve all positive and development feedback in those sessions, and have a clear set of milestones for your own development agreed (i.e. opportunity to present to a senior manager, opportunity to lead a the next team meeting, oportunity to… etc)

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 8:33 pm

    Hi Georgia, what do you think is the minimum time period you would expect someone to work for before promoting them?  Is there anything one can do to accelerate the process if your manager insists on 2 years at a particular level and you’d like to achieve the promotion in 18 months. Is there a way to persuade your manager that the extra 6 months are ‘unnecessary’Thanks I’m advance 

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 8:58 pm

      I made VP from AVP in 9 months and promoted someone from analyst to AVP within 11 months of hiring them, so no I do NOT believe there is a ‘minimum’ time period, people should be promoted through a meritocracy (within reason – if you’re looking for a promtion within 2 minutes of being hired that’s probably not a wise move!).

      Just keep  arecord of all the things your doing, how you’ve exceeded all of the objectives, benchmark yourself against all competencies required for the next level, and then actively seek out the support of other seniors to sponsor your belief that you should be promoted early

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 8:40 pm

    Good evening Georgia,

    When asked at an appraisal what your future plans are for your career, how do I honestly answer that question especially if it’s clear that the “desired future plan” does not exist within the current organisation?

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 9:02 pm

      This is a tricky one. Is the long-term future plan outside the current organisation, or the short term plan (i.e. next 12 – 24 months you can’t see yourself staying).

      If the former then it’s fine to say ‘my really long term goal would be xxx, but I’m committed to growing and developing here for the forseeable future’. If the latter (i.e. you see yourself wanting to leave very soon, I suggest being more wooly ‘I’m looking to develop my sofer skills but I’m not sure exactly what my future will be at the moment’. No-one wants to learn that team members are probably going to leave so it’s risky to say that’s your plan. So to protect yourself stay vague.

  • Bukola Adisa

    Member
    November 20, 2019 at 9:04 pm

    I am sure you will all agree with me that this has been a fantastic session with Georgia. Very helpful and insightful. Thanks to Georgia for sharing all these amazing nuggets with us and thanks to all the members who joined and asked questions.

    Have a lovely evening all and see you on the next one. We will now close this thread.

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 9:06 pm

      Absolutely loved the insightful gems in this thread. Thank you Georgia and Career Masterclass. I can see myself returning to this thread often! ????????????????????????

    • Bukola Adisa

      Member
      November 20, 2019 at 9:08 pm

      Agreed! We were incredibly lucky to have a true expert with us tonight. I will be going through this thread myself in preparation for my year end appraisals

    • Anonymous

      Deleted User
      November 20, 2019 at 9:13 pm

      Hi Georgia, thank you so much for all the practical answers to all the questions. I have learnt a lot and will still be going over this thread in the future. Thank you very much and have a lovely evening

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    November 20, 2019 at 9:11 pm

                                F I N A L  T H O U G H T S

    It can be very easy to focus on our strengths or what we did well without being truly self aware or self critical.
    While negative feedback isn’t ideal, it is a grwoth opportunity and will help you succeed if you are able to show a growth mindset ‘I will do better, I will use this as an opportunity for growth’.
    Remember to be open and honest with managers, and to make your own opportunities: this is your life and your career: it is your managers responsibility to manage you, give you feedback and delegate work to you, but it is not your managers responsibility to manage your whole career. Take responsibility and accountability for making things happen and for being a positive driver for change in your team or organisation.
    Rather than ‘I can’t’ switch it round to ‘I CAN’ and ‘I WILL’.

    Thanks so much for having me. Good luck to all of you as you progress in your careers.

The discussion ‘LIVE WEBCHAT with Georgia Simmons discussion thread’ is closed to new replies.

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